Kids and Chemicals: Out The Window

Check out the brother-sister duo Kids and Chemicals’ new track Out The Window. Elizabeth and Patrick Carney formed their endeavor in early 2010 and released their first self-titled record in 2011, which you can listen to on Spotify. They are currently working on a new EP, which is set to be released in the spring of 2013.

http://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/v=2/track=3895559238/size=venti/bgcol=FFFFFF/linkcol=4285BB/

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Underappreciation, Transformative Style, Old Age, Etc.

Earlier this week, the wife and I attended a show at the 9:30 Club – both of our favorite music venue (at least I think I’m pretty sure it’s hers too). We received the tickets as part of our wedding gift from two good friends. That’s what a good friend who stands up for you at your wedding does – gets you a personal gift that reflects something that made you great friends in the first place – the gift of live music.

Anyways, the show included three acts – Matthew Ryan, Laura Stevenson and the Cans, and the Gaslight Anthem.

Five observations from the show:

  1. Matthew Ryan is incredibly underrated. With a career spanning the better part of two decades and over a dozen albums, Ryan is one of the greatest singer-songwriters of our generation, yet can barely draw 200 people when performing as the opening act for a sold-out show. This is unfortunate.
  2. I am getting too old for a mosh pit. I think my neck and back agree.
  3. Laura Stevenson and the Cans are not terribly appealing. Despite only 2 EPs and 2 LPs, limited-to-no commercial success, and a real lack of originality, they had an unsettling an aura of pretentiousness about them on stage. Not my favorite.
  4. However, fun fact about Laura Stevenson – her grandfather composed ”The Little Drummer Boy” and “Do You Hear What I Hear?”
  5. The Gaslight Anthem really has something going. They’ve been able to tap into a variety of musical genres and appeal to a wide array of social subcultures – rockabillies, hipsters, punks, jocks, etc. I even saw a few card-carrying members of the AARP in attendance. A style this transformative is a recipe for both critical acclaim and commercial success.